Humic Acid Biostimulant Research by BHN Humic R&D Lab Scientists Published in Int’l Agronomic Journal

In its May 2021 issue, Frontiers in Plant Science published a research article by BHN Humic R&D Lab scientists Dr. Hiarhi Monda, Ryan Fountain, and Dr. Richard T. Lamar in collaboration with Dr. Amy McKenna of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility, Tallahassee, Fla.

The research, titled “Bioactivity of Humic Acids Extracted from Shale Ore: Molecular Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship With Tomato Plant Yield Under Nutritional Stress,” revealed an unprecedented level of molecular characterization made possible by means of ultra-high resolution ion cyclotron mass spectrometry, providing a more comprehensive understanding of individual components of humic substances involved in enhancing plant productivity.

A detailed characterization of chemical composition becomes critical as new government regulations of biostimulant products will require the elucidation of the mode of action in order to supply farmers with effective product claims based on science.

The objective of this study was to investigate in detail the chemical features of humic acids (HAs) extracted from sedimentary ore with the aim of exploring the potential relationship of chemical functions with biostimulant activity and to evaluate the extent to which the priming effect of HAs on tomato plants under nutritional stress was reflected on the yield gains. 

The results of this study proved the biostimulant efficacy of humic acid application that improved nutrient use efficiency and at the same time alleviated the nutritional stress condition. All tomato plants treated with humic acids showed faster adaptation to stress conditions, particularly when nutrient deficiency occurred. Plant growth and tomato yield increased when provided with humic acids under low nutritional doses, and tomato fruit quality was improved under all humic acid treatments.

The increased antioxidants production under humic application has been correlated to the presence of specific molecules in the humic extract. These molecules, such as quinones and flavonoids, can act as both antioxidants and pro-oxidants that can trigger the plant defensive system, ultimately leading to a fast and effective response to nutrient deficiency with a consequent enhancement of plant morphology and productivity.

Among the study’s conclusions are that plant pre-conditioning with humic substances might represent an important determinant in the adaptive plant defense response and an effective strategy to improve nutrients management and plant yield.

The complete open-access article is available at https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2021.660224/full.

The Huma Gro Farmer Podcast: Episode 10—Growing Premium Potatoes

Today on Episode 10 we’re talking about Growing Premium Potatoes with Huma Gro® Products. Our guests include Mr. Lyndon Smith, President and CEO of Bio Huma Netics, Inc.—the maker of Huma Gro®, Fertilgold® Organics, Mesa Verde Humates, and several other product lines—and Mr. Michael Gardner, Senior Director of Turf and Northwest Sales for Bio Huma Netics, Inc. Growing Potatoes is quite a complicated topic, so in this podcast we walk through the typical growth cycle of potatoes and discuss the nutrients that are needed at each stage. We also discuss products that you might need because of common deficiencies or pests and products that you might want to add in order to achieve premium quality for your crop.

Products Discussed:

Micro Carbon Technology®, Breakout®, Calcium, Copper, Fertil Humus®, Fertil Soil®, Golden Pro®, Huma Burst® 6mm(-), Huma Pro® 16, Jackpot®, Promax®, Proud 3®, Pur Cal®, Start-L™, Super Nitro®, Super Phos®, Super Potassium®, Vitol®, X-Tend®, Z-Max®, Zap®

The Huma Gro Farmer Podcast: Episode 9—Growing Premium Corn

Today on Episode 9 we’re talking about Growing Premium Corn with Huma Gro® Products. Our guests include Mr. Lyndon Smith, President and CEO of Bio Huma Netics, Inc.—the maker of Huma Gro®, Fertilgold® Organics, Mesa Verde Humates, and several other product lines—and Mr. Jason Garcia, Florida Sales Manager and Agronomist for Bio Huma Netics, Inc. Growing corn is quite a complicated topic, so in this podcast we walk through the typical growth cycle of corn and discuss the nutrients that are needed at each stage. We also discuss products that you might need because of common deficiencies or pests and products that you might want to add in order to achieve premium quality for your crop. We review the needs of both grain corn and sweet corn and discuss nutritional needs differences between the two.

Products Discussed

Micro Carbon Technology®, 44 Mag®, Activol®, Breakout®, Calcium, Cobalt, Copper, Crop-Gard®, D-Fend®, Fertil Humus®, Fertil Soil®, Fertilgold® XT, Fulvi Pro®, Golden Pro®, Huma Burst® 1–3 mm, Huma Burst® K Hume®, Huma Pro®, Jackpot®, Lucky 7®, Max Pak®, Molybdenum, Promax®, Proud 3®, Pur Cal®, Sulfur, Start-L™, Super Nitro®, Super Phos®, Super Potassium®, Vitol®, X-Tend®, Z-Max®, Zap®

Other Resources

Book mentioned during the podcast: For the Love of Soil, by Nicole Masters.

Humic Acids vs. Compost

Two of the most common methods used for rapidly increasing soil organic matter and improving soil biology are to add compost or to add humic substances. There are pros and cons with each. [Read more…]

8 Simple Steps to Healthy Crop Soil

by Larry Cooper

8 SIMPLE STEPS TO HEALTHY CROP SOIL: A PREVIEW

Of course, you'll need to read this complete article to understand how and why each of these steps is essential for creating healthy crop soil, but here's a preview.

  • Understand that soil is a living system.
  • Measure and document your soil characteristics.
  • Disturb the soil structure as little as possible.
  • Bring plant diversity to the soil.
  • Keep soil covered at all times.
  • Keep living roots in the soil all year round.
  • Build soil organic matter.
  • Have a soil health plan: Review and revise it regularly.

Decline in soil health is one of the most potentially devastating world-wide crises of the 21st century, but the average person who does not farm probably never gives farm soil a second’s thought: The supermarkets are fully stocked—everything must be okay, right?

It’s not. A Reuters news headline from 2014 stated, “Only 60 Years of Farming Left If Soil Degradation Continues.” The article quoted the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) as saying that about a third of the world’s soil has already been degraded from chemical-heavy farming techniques, deforestation, and global warming. It was predicted that in 2050 the amount of agricultural land, in particular, would be only a quarter of the amount available in 1960—yet we will have 2 billion more people to feed.

What can be done about it? Quite a bit, actually; though reversing soil degradation and improving soil health is going to require changes in thinking and changes in some very hard-wired cultural practices. The 8 Simple Steps to Healthy Crop Soil that we’re about to discuss are culled from a variety of farming philosophies, some as old as time itself. You can find them in modern-era discussions of Regenerative Agriculture, Restoration Agriculture, and Conservation Agriculture, but they also draw from many aspects of “conventional” farming that were in place long before the concept of “conventional” included chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Most important, these steps are modeled on the practices followed by Nature itself in every undisturbed forest floor, unplowed prairie, and pristine mountain meadow.

The very best thing about the 8 Simple Steps to Healthy Crop Soil is that these practices can be profitably applied with good results by commercial farmers (conventional and organic), hobby farmers, community gardeners, even the “square-foot” backyard gardeners in the middle of a city. And while geography, soil type, and soil history certainly influence how the 8 Simple Steps to Healthy Crop Soil are implemented, implementing them all (and it has to be all of them) will lead to good results in all soil-based plant-growing situations.

What are the benefits of healthy soil?

Better Yields. Healthy soil produces more abundant crops of higher quality that are less susceptible to pests and diseases, more drought resistant, and better tolerant of wind, heavy rain, hail, heat, and all the other mayhem that keeps farmers up at night.

Economic Return. In addition to better yields, crops will require less chemical input in terms of fertilizers and pesticides. This won’t happen overnight, or even necessarily in the first year or two. But in the long term, growers will find their input expenditures greatly reduced.

A Farm for the Kids. Restoring health to the soil in a sustainable way means that growers will leave their kids a productive, profitable farm that the kids, in turn, can also leave in good shape for the grandkids.

Saved Planet. Though not necessarily our immediate goal, following the 8 Simple Steps to Healthy Crop Soil will increase the amount of carbon sequestered in the soil and lower CO2 levels in the atmosphere, which will help reduce global warming and give our grandkids’ grandkids a decent world in which they can live and prosper.

With these impressive benefits in mind, let’s dig deeper into how to create healthy crop soil.

Download/read the complete White Paper here.

Our Humic Advantage

Humic substances, among the most wondrous products of nature, are the recycled essential residues of life. Plants harvest the sun’s energy and create life from that energy plus the carbon and oxygen they pull out of the air and the minerals they pull out of the soil. When plants die, all of their components are decomposed through the aid of microorganisms and mineralization, then returned to the soil as organic matter. [Read more…]

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