Huma Gro® Program Increases Peanut Yield Under Severe Conditions

Materials and Methods

This trial on peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Var. GA-12Y) was conducted in Memphis, Tenn. by AgriCenter International, as a randomized complete block study with 4 replications in 12.6’ x 30’ plots. The peanuts were planted on June 25 and harvested on December 14. Seven treatment programs were compared as shown in Table 1. [Read more…]

Huma Gro® Program Increases Sweet Potato Yields 39% With a 10:1 ROI

Materials and Methods

This trial on sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas, Var. Beauregard) was conducted in Memphis, Tenn. by AgriCenter International, in a randomized complete block study with 4 replications. Four treatment programs were compared: (Treatment 1) the grower’s standard preplant program of 20-60-60; (Treatment 2) the grower’s standard plus Huma Gro® Zap® applied in-furrow; (Treatment 3) the grower’s standard plus 3 Huma Gro® foliar-applied products—Jackpot®, Calcium, and Super Potassium®—applied at 30 days and again at 15 days prior to harvest; and
(Treatment 4) the grower’s standard plus Huma Gro® Zap® plus 3 Huma Gro® foliar-applied products applied at 30 days and again at 15 days prior to harvest. [Read more…]

Recoverable Sugar of Sugar Beets Yield Increased Using Huma Gro® Program

Materials and Methods

This trial on sugar beet (Beta vulgais) was conducted in Homedale, Idaho by SRS Farms & Crop Services. The crop was seeded on April 18 and was harvested on October 18. A basic grower’s standard fertilizer program was applied to all plots (300 lb/ac made up of MAP 11-52-0, potash 0-0-60, Tiger 90 sulfur, ammonium sulfate, Zn, Mn, and B). The additional Huma Gro® preharvest treatments (Jackpot® at 2 qt/ac, Huma Gro® Calcium at 1 qt/ac, and Super Potassium® at 1 qt/ac) were foliarly applied in September, 21 days before harvest (DBH) for Treatment 2 and Treatment 3, and in October, 10 DBH for Treatment 3. [Read more…]

Jason Garcia on Commercial Melon Growing with Huma Gro®

With Larry Cooper

Jason Garcia portrait

Jason Garcia

A few weeks ago in this space I wrote about vegetable growing with Huma Gro®. Today I’m writing about melons—which are a whole different proposition. In my part of Florida, growers frequently follow their strawberry crop with melons (typically watermelons or cantaloupes), seed-planted right into the strawberry beds while the strawberries are still producing their final fruits of the season. The plastic mulch and drip tape are still in place, but the fertilizer applications have wound down so as not to soften the berries and invite disease.

Bed Preparation

When the melon seeds are planted, we hope that it is into strawberry beds that have been using our Promax®/Zap® fumigation-replacement program. If so, then that program can continue through the drip irrigation right through seed planting and all the subsequent melon growth stages till harvest without interruption. If the beds weren’t on a Promax®/Zap® program for the strawberries, we recommend that you implement it for your melons; fumigation isn’t an option for the way this second crop is grown, but nematodes and soil-borne diseases can still severely damage your crop if they are allowed to take hold. Here’s a quick reminder of our Promax®/Zap® program that is much safer than fumigation, has no restrictions, and can be less than half the cost. [Read more…]

Jason Garcia on Commercial Vegetable Growing with Huma Gro®

With Larry Cooper

Jason Garcia portrait

Jason Garcia

Vegetable growers in Central Florida are preparing to get their beds ready for planting, so here’s my guide to how Huma Gro® can help growers get their best vegetable crops ever.

Bed Preparation

It’s become a pretty standard practice for Florida vegetable growers to fumigate their fields, then put down plastic and drip tape as their first steps in preparing planting beds for vegetables. Fumigation is generally considered to be a necessary—though expensive and sometimes controversial—first step to protect the coming crop from soil disease and nematode damage. Fumigation can be the most expensive part of vegetable production, and it comes with a host of safety precautions and restrictions that are a challenge for the grower and the surrounding community. But there is a Huma Gro® alternative that is much safer, has no restrictions, and can be up to half the cost of fumigation. [Read more…]

Humic Acids vs. Compost

Two of the most common methods used for rapidly increasing soil organic matter and improving soil biology are to add compost or to add humic substances. There are pros and cons with each. [Read more…]

El otoño es el momento de Fertil Humus®

En un blog del Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos (USDA) reciente, Spencer Miller expone los argumentos del caso “noviembre sin labranza”: la labranza repetida deteriora la estructura del suelo y reduce la estabilidad de los agregados. Descompone la materia orgánica y drena el carbón del suelo. Miller cita a Neil Sass, un agrónomo del USDA, que describió el drástico efecto que tiene la labranza en la microbiología del suelo “similar al de un terremoto, un tornado y un incendio que ocurren todos al mismo tiempo”. Y, al no causar ese tipo de devastación en el microbioma, “cuando se tiene el sostén de billones de microbios, se puede producir más con menos”. [Read more…]

Fall Is Fertil Humus® Time

In a recent USDA blog, Spencer Miller states the case for “No-Till November”: Repeated tillage undermines the soil structure and reduces aggregate stability. It breaks down organic matter and drains carbon from the soil.” He quotes Neil Sass, a USDA agronomist, who described the dramatic effect tillage has on soil microbiology as “akin to an earthquake, tornado, and fire happening all at the same time.” And by not inflicting that kind of devastation on the microbiome, “when you have the support of trillions of microbes, you can grow more with less.” [Read more…]

Our Humic Advantage

Humic substances, among the most wondrous products of nature, are the recycled essential residues of life. Plants harvest the sun’s energy and create life from that energy plus the carbon and oxygen they pull out of the air and the minerals they pull out of the soil. When plants die, all of their components are decomposed through the aid of microorganisms and mineralization, then returned to the soil as organic matter. [Read more…]

Huma Gro®: Practically Perfect in Every Way for Strawberries

Successful strawberry farming presents many unique challenges. As with every other type of crop, each farm will have its own challenges related to soil, soil tilth, soil pathogens, soil nutrient cycling, nutrient availability, plant vigor, irrigation needs, etc. Combined with those challenges are strawberry farming cultural practices related to continuous cropping and soil fumigation—with the resulting lack of crop diversity and soil microbial diversity that increases soil-borne diseases and tends to reduce yields over time. Strawberry farming continues to get more expensive while yields (and profits) are diminishing. What to do?
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