Bio Huma Netics Provides Innovative Crop Nutrition Products to China

The November 11, 2015 issue of AgroPages features an interview with Justin Smith, “Bio Huma Netics Provides Innovative Crop Nutrition Products to China.”

The article discusses our products, our introduction to the China market in 1999, our current distribution network, and the unique opportunities and challenges of China agriculture.

To read the article online, go to http://news.agropages.com/News/NewsDetail—16302.htm

Member of BHN Board of Directors to Head Arizona Department of Agriculture

Mark Killian Appointed by Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey to Succeed Retired ADA Director Don Butler

 Gilbert, AZ: Governor Doug Ducey has announced the appointment of Mark Killian as director of the Arizona Department of Agriculture.

“I’m pleased to announce the appointment of Mark Killian to lead the Arizona Department of Agriculture,” said Governor Ducey. “Mark brings decades of unique public service and private sector experience, and his extensive and successful background in farming and ranching will be hugely valuable in this role. He’s a welcome addition to this department and our administration.”

Mr. Killian has been a member of the Arizona Board of Regents since 2010, currently serving as chairman and previously as vice chairman and treasurer. Prior to joining ABOR, he was director of the Arizona Department of Revenue and served for 14 years in the Arizona State Legislature, including as Speaker of the House and House Majority Leader.

Mr. Killian also has decades of private sector experience. He is a licensed commercial real estate broker of more than 32 years specializing in the management of commercial real estate. He also is involved in family farming and ranching enterprises, overseeing the stewardship of 1,700 acres of farmland in Arizona, and is the current chairman of the Green Reservoir Flood Control district and the Santa Cruz River Alliance. He has been a member of the Bio Huma Netics, Inc. (BHN), Board of Directors since 2010.

Mr. Killian earned his Bachelor’s Degree in business administration with a specialization of real estate and urban planning from Arizona State University in 1981.

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 About Bio Huma Netics Inc.

Founded in Mesa, Arizona in 1973, Bio Huma Netics, Inc., (BHN) is a global leader in providing sustainable solutions to the world’s environmental challenges for agriculture (HUMA GRO®); horticulture, turf & ornamentals (HUMA GRO® TURF); and water & wastewater (PROBIOTIC SOLUTIONS®) through its constantly improving Micro Carbon Technology®. Learn more at www.bhn.us.

Evaluation of Micro-Carbon Technology-Based P Fertilizer, SUPER PHOS®, in Spring Wheat

Researchers at the University of Idaho and Montana State University have published a study in the 2015 Proceedings of the Western Nutrient Management Conference in which they compare the efficiency and effectiveness of top-dress and foliar application of Super Phos® with traditional P fertilizers. The one-year study concludes that Super Phos® performed very well in terms of spring wheat grain yield and grain protein content.

Read the complete study at http://bit.ly/1LsdnBt.

China—Hot Land for Global Novel Fertilizer

“China—Hot Land for Global Novel Fertilizer,” is a recent AgroPages feature article that includes Bio Huma Netics—with its Huma Gro® product line—among the top companies actively marketing novel fertilizers to China. Read the story at http://news.agropages.com/News/NewsDetail—15144.htm.

What Is Soil? (Part 1.1)

by Johann Buck, PhD

This two-part article continues our 2015 series on soil as we recognize the International Year of Soils. In Part 1.1 we define soil and its formation. In Part 1.2 we’ll continue with soil texture, structure, and color.

“Daddy, which is this – soil or dirt?” That’s the question Billy asked his father in one of my favorite The Family Circus comic strips.

Let’s begin with dirt. The word “dirt” is derived from the Old Norse word “drit,” which means excrement. Dirt is what you get under your fingernails or on your clothing or shoes while working in soil.

Several definitions exist for soil. Many of those definitions are, let’s be honest, dull. (Those specific definitions of soil can be found on the USDA Soil Education Web page). The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) first defines soil as “an amazing substance.” The SSSA continues to define soil as “a complex mix of minerals, air, water, and countless microorganisms, soil forms at the surface of the land and comes in many types.” In other words, soil possesses life, it supports life, and that makes soil exciting!

Okay, so soil is alive and exciting. How does it form? What is it made of? What does it look like?

Soil Formation
CLORPT. No, that word isn’t Klingon: it stands for “Climate, Organisms, Relief (landscape), Parent material, and Time.” These represent the five major soil-forming factors.

“Climate” determines the kind of plant and animal life that reside on and in the soil. Climate also influences soil temperature, the amount of water available for weathering minerals, and the rate of chemical weathering.

“Organisms,” such as plants and animals, contribute to the formation of soil by adding organic matter. Fungal and bacterial microorganisms subsequently break down the organic matter into a semi-soluble material known as humus, while insects, earthworms, and burrowing animals aid in the distribution of humus throughout the soil. Humus contributes to both soil chemical and physical properties. Humus is composed of small particles, which results in high surface area. These small particles contribute to the soil’s ability to supply and retain essential plant nutrients. The presence of humus can also improve soil physical properties such as water-holding capacity. Humus and its benefits will be addressed in subsequent newsletter articles.

The “Relief,” or landscape, includes the slope, aspect, and position of the soil. The steepness, shape, and length of slope affects the way water flows on or off the soil. Aspect is the compass direction that a slope faces and therefore affects soil temperature. North-facing slopes in the United States, generally speaking, are cooler and wetter than south-facing slopes.

“Parent material” is the mineral and organic material from which soil formation begins. The formation of soils is a continuous process that requires thousands of years for significant changes to occur. This is why “Time” is included as one of the five soil-forming factors. It is this weathering of the parent material over time that leads to the development of the soil horizons.

SoilHorizonsStylin’ and Profilin’
Soil forms in layers, and these layers are often parallel to the soil surface. Technically, these layers are called horizons and their formation is called horizonation. Although these horizons are
related, they differ from each other chemically, physically, and biologically. There are five master horizons, each represented by a letter (see Fig. at left): O, A, E, B, and C. A sixth horizon, represented by the letter R, is used to denote the underlying bedrock. The vertical arrangement of soil horizons is known as the soil profile. Soil profiles vary from location to location, and not all soil profiles possess all five master horizons. (Expanded details for each horizon can be found in the USDA NRCS publication, From the Ground Down.) Soils on older, more stable surfaces will generally possess well-defined soil horizons. The longer a soil has been exposed to events such as rain and plant growth, the more developed the soil profile.

Methodologies exist that scientists use to describe the components and characteristics of the soil profile. These standardized soil-profile descriptions are used to decide how a soil may be used and/or predict how a soil may react to its intended use. Not only are these soil descriptions useful for farmers, they are also useful for civil engineers, ecologists, and hydrologists – to name a few.

Be sure to read part 1.2 of this article in our next newsletter. Keep growing, and make it a good day!

Dr. Buck is North America Director of Technical Services for HUMA GRO®.

Read this and other articles in the Spring 2015 issue of The Solution at http://bhn.uberflip.com/i/513498-bhn-spring-2015-newsletter. Past issues are located at http://bhn.us/newsletters/.

HUMA GRO Training for Distributors and Clients from Peru and Mexico

Peru+MexicoDistribDelegation

Representatives from our distributors in México (Agroindustrias del Norte) and Perú (Agro Micro Bio Tech), along with some of their grape- and asparagus-producing clients (growers, farm managers, and technicians): The group spent two days at BHN headquarters in Gilbert, Arizona, receiving training in how to use HUMA GRO® products. BHN President and CEO Lyndon Smith is seated front-row, left.

HUMA GRO® ZAP® CAULIFLOWER TEST FIELD IN SPAIN

Cauliflower-Spain

Distributor: Huma Gro Hispaña
HUMA GRO® application was ZAP® 5L/ha

The cauliflower on the left was planted 3 weeks earlier than the cauliflower on the right, meaning the control is an older crop—although it looks worse for wear and is shorter. The two groups have equal nutrition programs: the difference is time and ZAP® at 5L/ha.

Because of the improvement in soil structure and the flourishing of microorganisms, there is more water available to the plant—resulting in a more vibrant color (an indicator that the plants are receiving more nutrients) and stronger vigor and turgidity (meaning the leaves are very firm and have absorbed more water than the control because there is more soil-available moisture). Along these same lines is that by having more water in the leaves, they are less susceptible to low-temperature stress and the plant physiology will continue to function at lower temperatures without losing pace, improving productivity.

HG-150327-01

Huma Gro Article on Micronutrients in CropLife Magazine

Micronutrients

CropLife Magazine currently features an article written by Huma Gro staff, “Micronutrients Are the Key To Better Yields.” The authors provide an overview of micronutrients and their relationship to the soil, common deficiencies, application methods, and the importance of following the 4Rs of Nutrient Stewardship. The article concludes by discussing the importance of developing a Micronutrient Plan in association with a local county extension office and an agriculture retailer. Read the article online at http://bit.ly/CropLife-HumaGro-Micronutrients.

A Life of Abundance!

The Huma Gro® family of products comes from Bio Huma Netics, Inc., a company that values mission over margin. Our mission is to “provide technologically advanced and ecologically sustainable quality products and services that replenish the earth by restoring water quality, reviving soil fertility, renewing food and fiber value, and refocusing engineered technologies—while minimizing human environmental impact and thereby enhancing the quality of life world-wide.” This video represents our company vision and commitment to help growers/operators and communities—both locally and all over the world—through our sustainable, efficient products and programs.

Southwest Ag Summit

SWAgSummit

Come see us at the Southwest Ag Summit at Arizona Western College in Yuma, Arizona, on February 25–26. Ray Speakman and Nathan Smith will be there in Booth 52 to answer all of your Huma Gro questions. For more information, go to www.swagsummit.com.

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